21 abril 2009


Un reportaje increíble que seguro os encantará tanto o más que a mi.

While all the big international fashion magazines exist and thrive in Mexico, it's the independent titles that are catching people's eye.

Mexico has its own versions of Vogue, Marie Claire, Glamour, InStyle and even Elle. But it's the independent magazines that set Mexico apart from any other country.

Mexico is a developing country with a newly booming middle class. All wanting to be seen and express themselves, the art, design and fashion worlds are colliding to create a fully-blown creative scene. During this renaissance a wave of publications have sprung up to both document and propel their stars into a national and global spotlight.

This array of handmade fanzines, edgy fashion magazines and art and design titles are available in abundance. Here we take a look at Mexico's most creative independent titles.

Si bien todas las grandes revistas de moda internacionales existen y prosperan en Mexico, es independiente de los títulos que están alcanzando los ojos del pueblo.

Mexico tiene sus propias versiones de Vogue, Marie Claire, Glamour, InStyle y Elle. Pero es la revistas independientes que establecen Mexico aparte de cualquier otro país.

Mexico es un país en desarrollo con una nueva clase media en auge. Todos los que quieran ver y expresarse, el arte, el diseño y la moda son los mundos que chocan para crear una verdadera escena creativa. Durante este renacimiento de una ola de publicaciones que han surgido tanto documento y propulsar sus estrellas en un centro de atención nacional y mundial.

Esta gama de mano fanzines, revistas de moda vanguardista y diseño de arte y los títulos están disponibles en abundancia. Aquí se echa un vistazo a Mexico de los títulos más creativos independientes.

Celeste was started seven years ago by Vanesa Fernández and Aldo Chaparro, who are now directors of the magazine. José García Torres, who also owns the trendy Proyectos Monclova Gallery, edits the triyearly publication.

Focusing on art, design, architecture and contemporary culture through interesting and edgy photography, this magazine is pioneering in such a burgeoning creative scene.

The collaborators on Celeste (and the sister publication Baby Baby Baby below) - photographers, stylists and artists - all play a big part in the Mexico City design movement going on right now.

The idea came from Celeste editor and Baby editor-in-chief José García Torres, along with his consort Alejandro Romero.

This publication originated from a one-off issue, which the advertisers loved, so it has now become a regular on the scene. Seen as the more lighthearted, fashion-focused, little sister of Celeste, Baby Baby Baby is directed more at a younger teen and early twenties crowd.

One of the most comprehensive fashion-focused titles in Mexico, Blink gives the mainstream fashion titles a run for their money.

With directional editorial and intersting titbits and articles from around the world, this magazine belies its national roots. However, it doesn't deny them, with stories on local designers and party pictures added into the mix for good measure.

Presented in a huge A3 colour matt newspaper format, this magazine mixes all elements of pop culture.

Actors and musicians are profiled alongside fashion editorials and experimental design. The usual fanzine-style CD and book reviews are also featured.

The cover images are weird and wonderful, striking a tone for what lies within. The tag line of "supervivencia y bienestar" - survival and wellbeing - adds a more serious tone.

Interesting illustration is used throughout. And the focus with photography is more on landscapes and portrait than fashion.

Código's tag line is art, architecture, music and fashion and it discusses them all.

Despite its high-quality production valies, Código is in fact a free magazine given out at small stores and boutique hotels. The content is short and to the point, profiling artists, architects and with fashion-forward editorial.

This bimonthly focuses on the arts, with less fashion content than the rest. Literature, cinema, music, architecture and the visual arts are the focus here - in that order of importance.

Films, theatre productions, architecture and design are all discussed in quite a grown-up, intellectual forum, with straightforward photography and in-depth text.

Moho more of a fanzine than anything else, this sturdy colourful magazine focuses on illustration, stories, photography and a combination of all three. MOHO deals with grown-up topics and texts.

This is the inaugural issue of this beautifully put-together fanzine. Made up almost entirely of drawings, cartoons, illustrations and handwritten texts, it has the feeling of a collectable that was really made by hand.

In a similar format to Código, this small, compact, well put together magazine discusses pop culture with a focus on cinema. Art, design, photography and all things surrounding that industry are also discussed.

Toast manages to cram a whole host of topics from modern culture into its compact format. Beautiful photography captures contemporary dance, cooking, illustration and art, with the people involved profiled.

This free magazine takes an international look at Mexico's contemporary culture, profiling the stars of its creative scenes.

Interviewees include everyone from Oscar-nominated Alejandro González Iñárritu, director of Babel; Zélika García, founder of MACO art fair; and José Andrés Patiño, director of Mexico Fashion Week.


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